Computational physics Using Python: Implementing Maxwell Equation for Circle Polarization

Authors

  • M Madlazim Jurusan Fisika FMIPA Universitas Negeri Surabaya
  • Bagus Jaya Santosa Jurusan Fisika FMIPA Universitas Negeri Surabaya

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.26740/jpfa.v1n1.p1-7

Keywords:

Circle Polarization, Maxwell equations, Teaching, Graphics, Computational physics, Finite Difference Time Domain, Python

Abstract

Python is a relatively new computing language, created by Guido van Rossum [A.S. Tanenbaum, R. van Renesse, H. van Staveren, G.J. Sharp, S.J. Mullender, A.J. Jansen, G. van Rossum, Experiences with the Amoeba distributed operating system, Communications of the ACM 33 (1990) 4663; also on-line at http://www.cs.vu.nl/pub/amoeba/, which is particularly suitable for teaching a course in computational physics. There are two questions to be considered: (i) For whom is the course intended? (ii) What are the criteria for a suitable language, and why choose Python? The criteria include the nature of the application. High performance computing requires a compiled language, e.g., FORTRAN. For some applications a computer algebra, e.g., Maple, is appropriate. For teaching, and for program development, an interpreted language has considerable advantages: Python appears particularly suitable. PythonŸs attractions include (i) its system of modules which makes it easy to extend, (ii) its excellent graphics (VPython module), (iii) its excellent on line documentation, (iv) it is free and can be downloaded from the web. Python and VPython will be described briefly, and some programs demonstrated numerical and animation of some phenomenal physics. In this article, we gave solution of circle polarization by solving Maxwell equation.

References

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T. Donaldson, Python as a first programming language for everyone, www.cs.ubc.ca/wccce/Program03/ papers/Toby.html.

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M. Lutz, D. Ascher, Learning Python, OŸReilly, ISBN 1-56592-464-9, 1999. [6] A.S. Tanenbaum, R. van Renesse, H. van Staveren, G.J. Sharp, S.J.

Mullender, A.J. Jansen, G. van Rossum, Experiences with the Amoeba distributed operating system, Communications of the ACM 33 (1990) 4663; also on-line at http://www.cs.vu.nl/pub/amoeba/.

RH Landau, MJ Paez, and CC BORDEIANU "A SURVEY OF COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS" Electronic Materials copyright: R Landau, Oregon State Univ, 2008; MJ Paez, Univ Antioquia, 2008; and CC BORDEIANU, Univ Bucharest, 2008.

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Published

2011-06-14

How to Cite

Madlazim, M. and Jaya Santosa, B. (2011) “Computational physics Using Python: Implementing Maxwell Equation for Circle Polarization”, Jurnal Penelitian Fisika dan Aplikasinya (JPFA), 1(1), pp. 1–7. doi: 10.26740/jpfa.v1n1.p1-7.

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